Rubidium strontium dating method Roulettevideochat

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Nevertheless, geologists insist the radioactive decay rates have always been constant, because it makes these radioactive clocks “work”!New evidence, however, has recently been discovered that can only be explained by the radioactive decay rates not having been constant in the past.9 For example, the radioactive decay of uranium in tiny crystals in a New Mexico granite ( yields a uranium-lead “age” of 1.5 billion years.These basalts yield ages of up to 1 million years based on the amounts of potassium and argon isotopes in the rocks.But when we date the rocks using the rubidium and strontium isotopes, we get an age of 1.143 billion years.Yet this view is based on a misunderstanding of how radiometric dating works.Part 1 (in the previous issue) explained how scientists observe unstable atoms changing into stable atoms in the present.PART 1: Back to Basics PART 2: Problems with the Assumptions PART 3: Making Sense of the Patterns This three-part series will help you properly understand radiometric dating, the assumptions that lead to inaccurate dates, and the clues about what really happened in the past.

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An hourglass is a helpful analogy to explain how geologists calculate the ages of rocks.When we look at sand in an hourglass, we can estimate how much time has passed based on the amount of sand that has fallen to the bottom.Radioactive rocks offer a similar “clock.” Radioactive atoms, such as uranium (the parent isotopes), decay into stable atoms, such as lead (the daughter isotopes), at a measurable rate.This source already had both rubidium and strontium.To make matters even worse for the claimed reliability of these radiometric dating methods, these same basalts that flowed from the top of the Canyon yield a samarium-neodymium age of about 916 million years,5 and a uranium-lead age of about 2.6 billion years!Based on these observations and the known rate of radioactive decay, they estimate the time it has taken for the daughter isotope to accumulate in the rock.

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