Stop dating violence

6854933580_2c8b688306_z

The building‐based intervention included the use of temporary school‐based restraining orders, higher levels of faculty and security presence in areas identified through student mapping of safe/unsafe “hot spots,” and the use of posters to increase awareness and reporting of teen dating violence to school personnel.Compared to a control group, the students who participated in the building-only interventions and those who experienced both the building interventions and the classroom interventions were more knowledgeable about the consequences of perpetrating teen dating violence, more likely to avoid areas where teen dating violence is likely to occur, and more likely to intervene as a bystander six months post intervention.The project educates youth about gender-based violence, and helps them to develop skills and social actions such as personal responsibility, communication, and community participation.An experimental study that randomly assigned 14- to 16-year-olds from child protective services to control or to the Youth Relationship Project curriculum found that the intervention was effective in reducing incidents of physical and emotional abuse and symptoms of emotional distress over time for the youth in the intervention.The study looked at the effectiveness of a classroom curriculum, a school intervention at the building level, and a combination of the two.The classroom intervention included six sessions in which there was an emphasis on the consequences of perpetrating teen dating violence (including state laws and penalties), the construction of gender roles, and healthy relationships.Activities aimed at increasing awareness and dispelling myths about violence in relationships are often included in the curriculum.

Significance wasn’t maintained for those who had been dating in the previous year.

However, boys in the intervention group were significantly less likely than boys in the control group to engage in dating violence (2.7 percent, compared to 7.1 percent).

Girls in both groups showed the same rates of dating violence (11.9 percent versus 12 percent).

For example, higher levels of bonding to parents and enhanced social skills can protect girls against victimization.

Similarly, for boys, high levels of parental bonding have been found to be associated with less externalizing behavior, which in turn is associated with less teen dating violence victimization.

How often high school kids intervene and why they do (or don’t) are questions that haven’t gotten a lot of attention, despite plenty of research showing that high schoolers experience high rates of sexual assault and dating violence.

You must have an account to comment. Please register or login here!